Kimberly P. Yow

Kimberly P. Yow

Hi there! I'm Kimberly Yow, a passionate journalist with a deep love for alternative rock. Combining my two passions, I've found my dream job. Join me on this exciting journey as I explore the world of journalism and rock music.

4 shocking true crime mysteries throughout history, from the ‘Zodiac Killer’ to the ‘Black Dahlia’

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In the world of true crime, certain cases have stood the test of time, shrouded in mystery and intrigue. 

True crime captivates audiences across various modern media forms, from documentaries and movies to TV shows, podcasts and books.

Here, we delve into the chilling narratives of unsolved mysteries that continue to captivate minds around the world.

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The late 1960s witnessed a reign of terror in Northern California, attributed to the self-named “Zodiac Killer.” The mysterious killer is linked to five murders in the San Francisco Bay Area.

The “Zodiac Killer” remains unidentified.

He taunted law enforcement and issued threats in letters sent to local newspapers from 1969 to 1974 before abruptly halting communication. In this correspondence, he asserted responsibility for as many as 37 killings, according to biography.com.

Containing specific details about the “Zodiac Killer” murders, these messages held information only the perpetrator could possess. The killer threatened further attacks if the letters were not printed on the front page of newspapers, instilling fear within the community and beyond.

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The intrigue surrounding these murders has inspired various books and films, including director David Fincher’s acclaimed 2007 production, “Zodiac.”

In 1947, the brutal murder of Elizabeth Short, famously known as the “Black Dahlia,” sent shock waves through Hollywood. 

On Jan. 15, 1947, Betty Bersinger, a local housewife, noticed what she initially thought was a mannequin in an empty lot on Norton Avenue in Los Angeles. To her horror, she realized it was Short’s corpse.

The gruesome nature of the crime, coupled with Short’s aspiring actress background, fueled countless theories. 

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Short’s body was severed at the waist, with portions of flesh removed. The lack of visible blood indicated post-mortem cleaning before the body was left on the street, reads FBI.gov.

Decades later, the case remains open.

The late 19th century saw the reign of “Jack the Ripper,” a shadowy figure haunting the streets of London’s Whitechapel district. 

The infamous “Jack the Ripper” struck fear in London’s East End in 1888. Preying on at least five prostitutes, the killer left a gruesome mark, demonstrating a disturbing knowledge of human anatomy.

“Since 1888, more than 100 suspects have been named, contributing to widespread folklore and ghoulish entertainment surrounding the mystery,” according to History.com. 

“Jack the Ripper” was never captured and remains one of England’s, and the world’s, most infamous criminals.

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In August 1918, amid the vibrant jazz scene of New Orleans, the “Axeman” terrorized the city.

The mysterious killer primarily targeted Italian grocers and their families, breaking into their homes and attacking them with an axe, leaving victims wounded or dead. 

The brutality of these attacks instilled fear, casting a dark shadow over the city.

The “Axeman’s” murder streak extended from 1917 to March 1919, targeting New Orleans households. The menacing killer later crossed the Mississippi River to Gretna. On March 9, 1919 he viciously attacked Charlie Cortimiglia, leaving him and his wife Rosie severely injured and claiming the life of their 2-year-old daughter, according to the Smithsonian.

With a letter claiming a supernatural motive and a penchant for jazz, the “Axeman’s” unsolved mystery continues to haunt New Orleans.

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