Kimberly P. Yow

Kimberly P. Yow

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Yum or yuck? Delicious things you can do with salty anchovies

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Did you know that true Italian Caesar dressing, Worcestershire sauce and Café de Paris butter, a popular condiment for steaks, are all made with anchovies?

Many other delicious staples at home are made with anchovies, too. 

So, is it high time to get over the “ick” factor?

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“There’s something off-putting at first about eating what looks more like bait, but these little guys are flavor powerhouses,” Michelle Doll Olson, culinary development manager at HelloFresh, told Fox News Digital.

“They can be pretty salty, so I’ll often add them to a recipe in lieu of salt.” 

“If they are mashed up or puréed in a sauce no one will know they are there, they’ll just think you’re a really good cook,” added Olson of Brooklyn, New York.

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Here are some amazing ways to use anchovies that you may not have thought of before.

“I love to make an anchovy spread for my sandwiches,” said Doll Olson, who keeps a small jar of anchovies in her fridge. 

To make the spread, combine one grated garlic clove, two tablespoons of fresh lemon juice, three oil-packed anchovy fillets (“smashed with the back of a spoon to be pasty”), ½ cup of mayonnaise and two teaspoons Dijon mustard.

“If this sounds like the base for a Caesar dressing, that’s because it is,” she said.

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“You can loosen it up a little with some good olive oil, but the mayo should make it nice and creamy for you,” Doll Olson added.

Embracing anchovies’ “briny essence unlocks a world of delicious possibilities in every dish they are used,” said Grace Vallo, food blogger and creator of TastefullyGrace.com in Boston, Massachusetts.

Try her Bagna Cauda — a traditional Italian olive oil dip. 

It’s served hot, with veggies or a crusty baguette.

Alicia Shevetone, creator of Dink Cuisine in Las Vegas, Nevada, is also a big fan of this umami-flecked dip.

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“There is an ancient Northern Italian dip my family has made for generations, called Bagna Cauda,” Shevetone said.

“Served warm with crudités and bread, it is traditionally made with anchovies, garlic and olive oil,” she shared — noting that in her household, they prefer to use butter instead of olive oil, and to add sour cream for “extra richness.” 

If you don’t have tinned or jarred anchovies, a tube of anchovy paste works, Shevetone said. 

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“Place all ingredients in a small pot and whisk over low heat until combined and warm. Each ingredient is to taste — but anchovy is a must!”

“Nothing warms my heart more than a flavor bomb baked in carbs,” said Shevetone, noting that this is the inspiration for her palmiers.

Here’s a walk-through of Shevetone’s recipe for this savory baked treat.

In a food processor, pulse garlic, anchovies (or anchovy paste), tomato paste, Kalamata olives and capers until a paste forms.

Unfurl a sheet of puff pastry, brush the paste in an even layer and generously sprinkle with grated Parmesan. 

Then, you’ll want to fold over the puff pastry, palmier-style, refrigerate for 30 minutes, cut into ½-inch slices, brush with egg wash and bake at 400 °F for 10 minutes. 

Reduce oven temperature to 350 °F and bake until golden, another 20–30 minutes.

Just add loved ones to the table — and everyone will likely be happy campers.

For more Lifestyle articles, visit www.foxnews.com/lifestyle.

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