Salmonella outbreak linked to cantaloupes has killed 2, infected 99: This is a ‘wake-up call’

A total of 99 illnesses have now been reported due to a salmonella outbreak linked to recalled cantaloupes, according to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) alert.

Forty-five people have been hospitalized — and two people have died as of Nov. 24.

The active recall of the affected cantaloupes, which has affected people in 32 states so far, was first issued on Nov. 17.

SALMONELLA-INFECTED CANTALOUPES LEAVE DOZENS SICK IN 15 STATES: HEALTH OFFICIALS

The following cantaloupes are included in the recall, per the CDC.

TRUFRESH RECALLS CANTALOUPES DISTRIBUTED TO NUMEROUS US STATES, CANADA OVER POSSIBLE SALMONELLA CONTAMINATION

So far, the CDC reports that the number of cases reported from each state is as follows: Arkansas (1), Arizona (7), California (1), Colorado (2), Georgia (3), Iowa (5), Illinois (4), Indiana (2), Kentucky (5), Massachusetts (1), Maryland (1), Michigan (1), Minnesota (13), Missouri (9), Mississippi (1), North Carolina (2), Nebraska (4), New Jersey (1), Nevada (2), New York (1), Ohio (8), Oklahoma (1), Oregon (1), Pennsylvania (1), Rhode Island (1), South Carolina (3), Tennessee (4), Texas (3), Utah (1), Virginia (1), Washington (1), and Wisconsin (8). 

Salmonella is a type of bacteria found in food that can cause digestive illness.

Most people who are infected experience diarrhea, fever and stomach cramps anywhere between six hours to six days after consuming the contaminated food.

Within a few days, most people recover on their own — but some people in high-risk groups may get severely ill and require immediate treatment or hospitalization, according to the CDC.

Anyone who has consumed any recalled cantaloupes should seek immediate medical attention if they experience any of the following symptoms:

Dr. Marc Siegel, clinical professor of medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center and a Fox News medical contributor, said salmonella produces several toxins. 

“Symptoms include diarrhea, bloody diarrhea and profuse vomiting, so dehydration is a primary concern,” he told Fox News Digital. 

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The infection is particularly problematic for very young kids, elderly people and those with a compromised immune system who cannot clear the bacteria as easily and may get very sick, hospitalized or die, the doctor noted.

“The cantaloupes come from Mexico, and the bacteria could be from food handlers or animal or irrigation contamination,” Siegel said.

The doctor called this a “further wake-up call that produce grown in a place where the U.S. has little to no control can be packaged and sold in many states, endangering many people.”

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