Kimberly P. Yow

Kimberly P. Yow

Hi there! I'm Kimberly Yow, a passionate journalist with a deep love for alternative rock. Combining my two passions, I've found my dream job. Join me on this exciting journey as I explore the world of journalism and rock music.

Rolling Stones tour sponsored by AARP as 80-year-old rocker Mick Jagger set to hit the road

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Iconic rock band The Rolling Stones announced a 2024 North American tour on Tuesday but may be showing their age with a key detail

The Rolling Stones’ Hackney Diamonds tour is sponsored by AARP, the organization “dedicated to empowering Americans 50 and older to choose how they live as they age.”

The Rolling Stones have been eligible for AARP for decades, as Mick Jagger is 80, Keith Richards is 79 and Ronnie Woods is 76. The tour announcement was splashed across the AARP website. 

MICK JAGGER ADMITS PROBLEM WITH ‘OLD AGE,’ ‘MISTAKES’ HE’S MADE WITH THE ROLLING STONES

The Rolling Stones released a new album, “Hackney Diamonds,” last month, the iconic band’s first studio album since 2005’s “A Bigger Bang.” The album features collaborations with famed artists like Paul McCartney, Elton John and Lady Gaga.

It’s the Stones’ first album since the death of their original drummer, Charlie Watts, in 2021.

The Stones will play in 16 cities across the U.S. and Canada, and AARP members will have access to a special presale. The tour kicks off next April in Houston​ and wraps up in July in Santa Clara, California.

Jagger recently graced the cover of WSJ Magazine, and admitted he has problems with “old age” in the interview. He also said he’s made “mistakes” while being the frontman and one of the founders of The Rolling Stones for more than six decades. 

ROLLING STONES’ KEITH RICHARDS REVEALS HOW ARTHRITIS CHANGED HIS PLAYING STYLE: ‘THE GUITAR WILL SHOW ME’

Last year, The Rolling Stones celebrated its 60th anniversary.

In a recent interview with the BBC, Richards explained he’s changing his approach to playing guitar while suffering from arthritis after over 60 years with the band. He’s noticed a difference in his playing, but isn’t hurting from it.

“Funnily enough, I’ve no doubt it has, but I don’t have any pain, it’s a sort of benign version,” Richards explained. “I think if I’ve slowed down a little bit, it’s probably due more to age.”

ROLLING STONES OUTLIVE CANCEL CULTURE, CONTROVERSY WITH NEW MUSIC 60 YEARS LATER

Richards continued, “And also, I found that interesting, when I’m like, ‘I can’t quite do that anymore,’ the guitar will show me there’s another way of doing it. Some finger will go one space different and a whole new door opens.” 

According to its website, “AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to the more than 100 million Americans 50-plus and their families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also works for individuals in the marketplace by sparking new solutions and allowing carefully chosen, high-quality products and services to carry the AARP name.”

Fox News’ Elizabeth Stanton contributed to this report. 

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