Kimberly P. Yow

Kimberly P. Yow

Hi there! I'm Kimberly Yow, a passionate journalist with a deep love for alternative rock. Combining my two passions, I've found my dream job. Join me on this exciting journey as I explore the world of journalism and rock music.

Derek Chauvin claims new evidence shows he didn’t cause George Floyd’s death, attempts to overturn conviction

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Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin is making another attempt to overturn his federal civil rights conviction in the 2020 murder of George Floyd.

Chauvin, who was back in court Wednesday, is claiming that new evidence shows he didn’t cause Floyd’s death in Minnesota.

In a motion filed in federal court Monday, Chauvin said he never would have pleaded guilty in 2021 if he had known about the theories of a Kansas pathologist, whom he had been in contact with in February. 

Chauvin is asking the judge who presided over his trial to throw out his civil rights conviction and order a new trial, or at least a hearing for him to present the new evidence.

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Chauvin, who is serving a 21-year sentence at a federal prison in Arizona, filed the request without a lawyer.

According to records, Chauvin says Dr. William Schaetzel, of Topeka, Kansas, told him that he believes Floyd died from complications of a rare tumor called a paraganglioma that can cause a fatal surge of adrenaline. 

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It is noted that the pathologist did not examine Floyd’s body but did review autopsy reports.

In his motion, Chauvin claims that no jury would have convicted him if it had heard the pathologist’s evidence.

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A federal appeals court has rejected Chauvin’s requests for a rehearing twice, and he is still waiting for the U.S. Supreme Court to decide whether it will hear his appeal of his state court murder conviction.

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