Kimberly P. Yow

Kimberly P. Yow

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Ahead of Thanksgiving, veterinarian reveals a common reason pets wind up in the ER during the holidays

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Thanksgiving is coming up quickly and plenty of Americans are already prepping for the feast-filled holiday. 

With extra visitors coming by and sometimes last-minute chaos at home, pets can tend to be overlooked during holiday time. 

Dr. Lindsay Butzer, a veterinarian from Boca Raton, Florida, shared with Fox News Digital her top tips for keeping pets safe this Thanksgiving holiday.

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The veterinarian said her top recommendation for pet owners is to not overfeed their animals during the holiday.

Read on for why — and for other insights. 

Butzer said feeding your pets some table food on Thanksgiving can be OK — but that owners should proceed with caution. 

“Overindulging in food is hard for us, and even our pets, to digest,” she said. “Food bloat is a real condition for pets that makes them uncomfortable and sick.”

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She said pets are safe to eat turkey with no seasoned skin and minimal fat, as well as plain steamed green beans, rice, plain potatoes, boiled carrots and other vegetables.

But “have your pets stay away from eating turkey skin, buttery vegetables, gravy, bones and desserts,” she said. 

The Clint Moore Animal Hospital veterinarian has over 165,000 TikTok followers and is known for sharing pet tips and tricks for animal owners. 

Butzer said that veterinarians often can tell when a pet has been fed human food — and too much of it — after the holidays.

She also advised being careful if food drops on the floor, where pets would have easy access to it. 

Throwing trash in the correct spot where pets cannot get to the remnants of a festive dinner is crucial for pet safety this Thanksgiving, according to Butzer. 

“Dogs, and even cats, can smell right through the trash to find the leftover turkey bones, which are dangerous if they ingest it,” she said. 

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Butzer said a common ER vet visit on Thanksgiving starts with, “My dog ripped open the trash bag, and I found him devouring the turkey bones.” 

The veterinarian said a visit to the vet ER for a turkey bone ingestion and inducing vomit can cost over $500 — never mind discomfort for the animal and plenty of inconvenience for everyone involved. 

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“Hide the trash,” recommended Butzger. 

With potentially many people congregating in one place, Butzer said pets can often experience stress in their own homes. 

“Depending on how social your dog or cat is, you may want to keep your pets in their crate or in a bedroom away from the food and festivities to keep them calm and safe,” she said.

While some pets may feel anxious around new people in their home, Butzer also said it’s OK for social animals to be part of the fun.

“Social dogs and indoor or outdoor cats may like to be out and about, having fun,” she noted.

For more Lifestyle articles, visit www.foxnews.com/lifestyle.

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