Kimberly P. Yow

Kimberly P. Yow

Hi there! I'm Kimberly Yow, a passionate journalist with a deep love for alternative rock. Combining my two passions, I've found my dream job. Join me on this exciting journey as I explore the world of journalism and rock music.

Young, White men and women polarized over political leanings and feminism: Survey

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A new survey has found that America’s younger generation is polarized by gender, with young men and women holding highly different political viewpoints.

According to The American Enterprise Institute’s (AEI) Survey Center on American Life, 42% of Generation Z women identify as liberal, compared to 35% of Gen Z men. Gen Z refers broadly to the demographic born between the mid-1990s and early 2010s.

This gap widens considerably among White men and women.

Approximately 46% of surveyed Gen Z White women report being liberal. That number drops to 28% of Generation Z White men who identify similarly. 

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This trend indicates a rise in liberalism among women and a drop among men versus the previous generation, the Millennials, who respectively hold a 34% and 39% liberal-leaning among White men and women.

While Gen Z politics lean liberal, this does not necessarily translate to Democratic support; 32% of Gen Z adults identify as Democrats, compared to 21% as Republicans.

Gen Z women are also the most likely to report that people of the opposite sex have disrespected them.

This feeling has slowly increased based on generation. 25% of Baby Boomer women felt they had been disrespected because of their gender in the past 12 months. That number rose to 32% among Generation X women, 44% among Millennials and a staggering 50% among Generation Z.

When asked whether the “feminist” label describes them well, 61% of Gen Z women agreed, while only 43% of Gen Z men felt the same.

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Religious affiliation and LGBTQ identification also differ significantly in Generation Z compared to previous generations.

More than 1 in 3 Gen Z adults say they are not affiliated with a religion, doubling the numbers found among Baby Boomers.

Furthermore, Gen Z is five times more likely to identify as LGBTQ.

While most Americans have their first romantic experiences during their formative years, teenagers today are increasingly less likely to have a romantic partner.

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About 56% of Gen Z adults report having a girlfriend or boyfriend as a teenager, while 41% said they did not have this experience.

However, 69% of Millennials, 76% of Generation X and 78% of Baby Boomers said they had a romantic partner at some point during their adolescence.

The AEI noted that religious involvement and drug use have, for some time, been inversely related. As teens spent more time in church, they were less likely to use alcohol and drugs.

The same cannot be said of Gen Z. Only 52% of Gen Z adults said they regularly attended religious services in their teens, while 45% said they did not participate at all.

Despite these figures, Gen Z is less likely to use alcohol and drugs than older generations. Less than one-third (32%) of Gen Z reported occasional alcohol, cigarette, or drug use as teenagers. Forty-three percent of Millennials, 52% of Generation X and 52% of Baby Boomers said they had occasionally dabbled in mind-altering substances.

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